Inconsistent Retention Function

Inconsistent Retention Function

Mithkus’s paper uses mathematical models to describe the body burden of Aluminum following the pediatric vaccination schedule. In that paper he uses a retention function based on observational data captured through an adult volunteer who was injected with Aluminum Citrate, which has a completely different solubility profile than the adjuvant we inject with vaccines. Flarend […]

Create Aluminum MRLs in Matlab

One of the most cited papers defending the safety and use of Aluminum (Al) in vaccines was published by [Keith in 2002]. They used a mathematical models and various assumptions to model the infant body burdens during the first year of life for breast milk and formula diets and for a standard vaccination schedule. They […]

Do-The-Math: Too Much Aluminum

Do-The-Math: Too Much Aluminum

Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earth’s crust, yet very little makes its way into our bodies. A fact that is largely ignored by vaccine advocates is that dietary aluminum compounds dissociate in stomach acid and only between 0.01% and 1.0% is absorbed, typically 0.3%. In contrast, aluminum via vaccines is directly administered […]

Measles – A Late Victory for Vaccines

Measles – A Late Victory for Vaccines

Recently, we argued that one should prefer death-rate statistics over incidence data because the quality of reporting is higher (The Curious Incidence of Death Rates in the 20th Century). We deliberately avoided actual conclusions about vaccine effectiveness, which is a topic to which we now turn. We’ll be looking at a particular vaccine for a particular […]

The Curious Incident of Death Rates in the 20th Century

How we measure vaccine outcomes is a matter of life and death. Should we use cases/incidence of a disease or should we use mortality rates when measuring vaccine success? If you visit “sciencebasedmedicine” they suggest that you should use incidents of measles to measure vaccine effectiveness. If you look at the following graph, you can see […]